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Why the ‘cadet’ who went on to become the world’s most famous actress is a woman with a very special relationship with her father

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In her new memoir, “Cadet”, the writer, novelist and playwright Astrid Schuster, tells the story of how, after the end of the war, her father, the late William Schuster Sr., made the decision to make his daughter, Frances, the heir to his lucrative publishing empire.

“I can’t help but feel a mixture of sadness, admiration and sadness about the way my father treated my mother, who was also a very powerful woman in the publishing world, but who he knew, knew well, would be a bad influence,” she wrote in her introduction.

“It was his decision that ultimately brought me up to become a writer and, I think, his love for me.”

The two share an unbroken friendship that goes back to childhood, and the family’s first marriage, when Frances was four.

But while her mother was deeply affected by her father’s death, Frances also felt the pain and anxiety of her own family’s history.

“The last years of my life were spent struggling with the guilt of the past, and my father’s refusal to acknowledge my mother’s existence, to acknowledge how he had treated her,” she said.

“And so I felt a sense of relief and a sense that everything was going to be alright.

But I also felt like my father was doing this for me, because he thought that was how it should be.”

It was an uneasy marriage that was in danger of breaking down in the early 1960s, when William Sr. was diagnosed with cancer and moved into a nursing home in New Jersey.

He was put into a medically induced coma in the middle of the night and died of a heart attack.

It was a devastating loss for his family, and Frances moved back to New York to live with her aunt and uncle in Brooklyn.

“My mother was living with her husband and his family in New York when I was very young,” she told the New York Times.

They did not want me to live up to the image of a daughter of medical expertise, to the expectations of a woman who was the wife of a physician.” “

But they were also very resentful, because my mother was the daughter of a doctor.

They did not want me to live up to the image of a daughter of medical expertise, to the expectations of a woman who was the wife of a physician.”

Frances and William Sr had an uneasy relationship, with William Sr telling the Times: “You know, my father is not my friend.

He is my enemy.

I have never wanted to have a relationship with my father.”

Frances’ father, who died in 1986, was a successful businessman and the founder of the family publishing company, Scribner.

Frances and her sister, Barbara, would often spend weekends at their grandparents’ home in the Bronx, which they shared with her mother and brothers, Michael, Joseph and Mark.

“As we grew older, we became really close to my mother and my grandmother,” Frances said.

Frances said she was shocked when her mother told her about her father and how she was so happy for him.

“She said that her father had always been a man of integrity and he never once made a mistake,” she recalled.

“So that was really shocking to me because I didn’t think he’d have any such faults.”

Frances was shocked by the revelation, but in later years, she would be impressed by how much she was able to learn from her father.

“He taught me that when I see people do something bad and they have the gall to say that they are sorry and they are ashamed, that’s not forgiveness, that is self-deception, and it is also a betrayal,” she continued.

“That’s how my father taught me, and I’ve learned that from him.

It’s very hard to be an actress and not learn from your father.

He taught me a lot.”

In her book, Frances recalled that she and her father spent much of their time together during the early stages of their marriage.

“We had a really beautiful time,” she writes.

“There were times when we had tea in his room, we’d go to the park together, we would go to movies together.

But things didn’t go as planned for Frances and George, who were both diagnosed with breast cancer. “

In those early years, he would say, ‘You’re not going to have children, you’re going to stay married to me.'”

But things didn’t go as planned for Frances and George, who were both diagnosed with breast cancer.

“George would always tell me that my father had a ‘gut feeling’ about this and I had to find out why,” she recalls.

“For George, my mother died at her age.

I was in a very vulnerable position, because George was a very young child.

But when I asked him why, he told me that he knew my father and he had to tell me the truth.

I had a hard time with that.

But he said, ‘Well, I don’t know what my gut feeling is.’ ” And that

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